May 16, 2021
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How to Give Your Business A Spring Cleaning

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Birds are chirping. Flowers are growing. Cobwebs are dusted and your home is feelin’ fresh… So why does your business still feel like it’s stuck in the winter blues.

I love a good spring cleaning. It’s the perfect time to clear the mess at home, let the fresh air flow in, and clean up whatever mess is happening in your business.

If you want to earn serious money, there’s no better time than the spring to step back and reflect on all the changes your business has experienced in the last 365 days.

Grab a pen and paper and do a quick inventory.

  1. Did you add or remove any products?
  2. Are there significant changes to your business model?
  3. What content are you producing, and how are you utilizing it for marketing?
  4. Who are you currently working with?

Once you’ve answered these four questions, it’s time to get real with yourself.

Start identifying the things in your business that are working. Look at what’s selling. Identify the marketing efforts that are bringing in new leads. Identify who on your team is thriving. Ask yourself what these success stories mean to you.

After you’ve identified and reflected on these wins, it’s time to dive deep inside and start cleaning up any messes surrounding what isn’t working for you.

Overhaul any marketing strategies that aren’t pulling in leads. Identify what content you hate creating. Start asking yourself what pieces of your business you hate having to manage, then start to make plans on hiring someone who can handle those aspects.

After you’ve identified and reflected on these wins, it’s time to dive deep inside and get brutally honest about what isn’t working for you.

On today’s episode, I’m going to break down four MAJOR ways you can clean up your business and ditch the overwhelm!

If you listen in today and struggle with overcoming hustle culture, I invite you to download my Coaching Toolkit. This kit includes a Future Self Requirements journal to help you tap into your business, define your goals, and understand how to become the most unstoppable version of yourself.

Finding inspiration is easier than ever! Just text RCCPodcast to +1 (812) 408-1823 to get weekly pep talks from Susan Hyatt.

Featured on the Show:

Full Episode Transcript:

Susan Hyatt:
Welcome to the Rich Coach Club, the podcast that teaches you how to build your dream coaching practice and how to significantly increase your income. If you're a coach and you're determined to start making more money, this show is for you. I'm Master Certified Life Coach Susan Hyatt, and I'm psyched for you to join me on this journey.

Susan Hyatt:
Hey, coaches. All right, I just got back from Puerto Rico. I got some sun, some vitamin D, no offense to winter but I am enjoying thawing out. Spring is here and I'm betting that if you're anything like me, your business needs a good old spring cleaning. And I'm not talking about just checking your website for typos. That's fine, too. I'm talking about things like refreshing your marketing plan, sprucing up your support team, ditching household culture and making more time for self-care.

Susan Hyatt:
Listen, I just did an amazing episode on hustle culture. You need to go listen to the episode I released last week. Detoxing relationships, whether they're personal or professional, and so in today's episode not only do we have an amazing interview with one of my Mastermind clients, Shannon Claire. She is literally the epitome of phoenix rising from the ashes. But, I'm also going to share four major ways you can clean up your act this spring.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay. So, let's start with giving your marketing a serious refresh. Now you know, I'm super passionate about helping you get rich in your coaching practice. It's literally the name of this podcast. But listen, booberry, outdated marketing strategies are doing you no favors. If you're plugging away and not seeing the results that you want, I've got you. So, first, get a fresh sheet of paper, get a cute pen, and let's take inventory of all the ways you're marketing your business. And then, jot down how each of these strategies makes you feel. Would you rather stab your eyeballs out than post on Facebook? But absolutely love making Instagram reels? Let's scribble out all your feels, and then evaluate how well each of these methods are working for you with a strong focus on what's bringing in qualified leads.

Susan Hyatt:
So, attention is just that. Attention. What you're seeking is bankable attention, the kind that leads to more clients, more opportunities and money in the bank, because let me tell you something, and many of you listening are right there. I've coached so many "influencers" who weren't able to turn that attention into money. We want to scale our magic. We want to scale our heart. We want to scale our talent and have that come back to us. Just eyeballs doesn't mean anything. Bankable attention. And also, sidenote, the Rich Coach Club Facebook group is the perfect place to dust off your marketing methods and get some refresh inspo to build your dream coaching practice.

Susan Hyatt:
Also, I just have to say, too, ON THE 6, which is my year-long Mastermind, you should get in there because we offer so much support for this. But, I want to help you also spruce up your help. Some of you might have a full support team. Others of you might have just a few freelancers or contractors, and some of you might be considering your very first hire. You'll want to evaluate your staffing needs and discover any gaps that you might have. I've been doing this, y'all, since December. I've literally cried so many tears about... I've had to just revamp my team and figure out what we need, and we're still not there yet.

Susan Hyatt:
I'm still searching for some unicorns to fill some of these gaps, but you really, really have to take a look at who you're paying, and are they delivering? And if you're new to business, think about something you want to outsource to give you more time to do what you do best. Take note of any exceptional employees or contractors on your team. Can you promote them? Can you offer them an extended role in your company? Spring-cleaning is also a good time to evaluate if you need to retrain or let go of any employees who don't align with your mission, or those who exhibit toxic behavior.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay, we can't have any of that up in here, in a life coaching business, okay? And you deserve the help that you need. You deserve the best possible talent. So, you want to scrub that schedule as well and make time for self-care. So, I've also been doing this because we aren't fully staffed right now. I've been doing a lot of extra stuff that I don't want to be doing. Many of you have heard me joke about basically duct taping my company together literally right now. And I've been doing a lot of stuff that I don't want to ever do again. And I honestly don't think I would be surviving this and still laughing if I wasn't so devoted to my self-care.

Susan Hyatt:
I'm still getting amazing sleep, I'm still going on runs and riding my Peloton and lifting weights and hydrating and eating well and all those things, but something that I definitely crave more of is quiet. Quiet time is so important to me. And listen, hustle culture is real and it's real toxic, y'all. Constantly working and grinding through spring will only lead to a summer of fizzle and not sizzle. So take a good, hard, honest look at your schedule and determine what you can scrub to give yourself more freedom and sanity.

Susan Hyatt:
Anybody else, every time I say scrub, does anybody else think of (singing)? All right. One way I do this, and I'm getting back to it this Friday, is a digital detox. This concept is not new. It often includes like, people are so dramatic about it. I'm on hiatus, only to return back to social media immediately. What I have found is that committing to going off the grid for just a day, one day per week, that's a great way to wring out my social media time and feel really refreshed when I come back online. So, several episodes ago I talked about this and I basically go offline Friday afternoon, or early evening, until Saturday dinner time, and I'm getting back to it.

Susan Hyatt:
I was just coaching a one-on-one client who just came off of a successful launch, and she was saying just how tired she was and how burnt-out she felt. And I'm like, "All right, you and I together, we're going to get back on this digital detox and we're going to do it." So, that's one way to spring-clean your business, but also you want to detox relationships that are toxic. Get that right out of your life. And by relationships we could mean romantic, platonic, professional, cordial, anyone you come in contact with on a regular basis. So if your neighbor can't stop dumping all their drama on you, it might be time to set a serious boundary, or end that arrangement altogether.

Susan Hyatt:
If your barista serves up your latte with a grunt and a frown, hit up another place, y'all. If your second cousin can't stop spewing their harmful views at family events, just say no to the next gathering. So there you have it. Wash that mess out and welcome in a season full of renewed energy, bigger opportunities, and way less stress. Your mind, body and business will thank you. Now later in this episode I teased and mentioned you're going to meet Shannon Claire. She's going to have a lot of inspo in this area because she literally rebuilt her life and rebuilt her business. And I love sharing stories where women have hit bottom and rose right back up. So, stay tuned for that.

Susan Hyatt:
All right, it's time to share a community win. And, y'all, I love talking about success stories because, honestly, as women, as female entrepreneurs, we tend to be trained not to share what's going well. And I'm happy that I've created a community, not just in my free Facebook group Rich Coach Club, but also within my Masterminds that my people feel excited to share what's going well. And so I want to give some love to Suzy Rosenstein. So, Suzy shared, we had talked about during some hot-seat coaching what she should do and how she should structure her offers, and she said, "I just wanted to share I'm celebrating a win. I just had my first Clear On Career small group kick-off, and it's a 13-week coaching program. It's something that I've been wanting to do for a while, especially since Susan first helped me see there were so many of my clients that want this."

Susan Hyatt:
And so, she's already sold at a great price point. She's got money rolling in. Congratulations, Suzy, for launching that program. I'm so proud of you. So, I would love to brag on you, too. If you're not yet a member of the Rich Coach Club Facebook group, get in there. And better yet, if you want to be part of a community that really rallies around each other, get into one of my Masterminds. We'll put all the details in the show notes.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay, now it's time for the interview I've been teasing about. You're going to love Shannon Claire. Shannon Claire is a serial entrepreneur. She's a business woman. She's a mom, and she is a phoenix who has risen from the ashes. I can't wait for you to experience all this goodness. Get your notebook back out. You're going to want to take notes. Welcome to the show, Shannon Claire.

Shannon Claire:
Thanks so much for having me, Susan.

Susan Hyatt:
So, I was telling you before we started the recording, this woman who I knew from high school sent me this message, and she was like, "You just think you're a badass because you wear bikinis and drop f-bombs." And I had to laugh because I was just like, "Well, there is a little story about reclaiming the bikini being a rape survivor." But, that's actually not why I consider myself a badass. There are lots of other reasons why I consider myself a badass, and it's something we're talking about in the Mastermind being willing as a woman to say, "I'm feeling pretty badass because." And I feel pretty badass for a lot of reasons, and it's mostly about impact and helping people.

Susan Hyatt:
I think that comes from having gone through some stuff, which brings you into the picture, because you are quite the badass with your personal story, and when I heard you talking about just the phoenix rising from the ashes vibe pouring out of you, I wanted to have you on the show to inspire listeners that, number one, you can go through some things and have the courage to change your life. And number two, not only can you change your life, but you can become profitable beyond whatever you thought was possible for yourself when you do.

Shannon Claire:
Absolutely. Yeah. And there's always going to be those wet noodles who want to rain on our parade.

Susan Hyatt:
Wet noodles? Right. It's just like, "Lady f-bombs in bikinis aren't even the start of it."

Shannon Claire:
Like surface-level shit.

Susan Hyatt:
Right. It's just kind of like, "Oh, my goodness." So, let's talk about, now you are a very successful coach and photographer and you're a new mom with older kids, too, and a new husband and a new house and this whole new life, and so people seeing that may be like, "Oh, she's got it all together." But, take us back a little bit to where you were before, and we'll talk about how you got where you are now.

Shannon Claire:
Absolutely. So I'll give you the eagle's eye view of my life story. So, I grew up in a small town, rural, Pennsylvania. Did not have a lot growing up. I was not born into any kind of wealth or even entrepreneurial spirit. Through my teens years I was a total rebel. I gave my poor mother a run for her money, and ended up pregnant going into my senior year of high school.

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Shannon Claire:
So that was a turning point in my life because all of a sudden I am responsible for this new little life inside of me, and it was the best thing that could have happened to me at that time in my life. And right after I graduated high school I got married, and that marriage quickly devolved into many, many years of emotional abuse. And it took me... I just found recently, actually, a journal entry where I finally recognized that it was abuse that I was experiencing, and I think it took me until 2014, so about 12 years of marriage, until I'm like, "This is abuse."

Shannon Claire:
Because I just always had the understanding and impression, from hearing older people talk about marriage, that marriage is hard. You have to stick with it. Don't look at the grass on the other side. It always greener. You just have to stay where you're at, be committed, no matter what. And I'm also a pretty stubborn person, so when I want to make something work, I'm going to do everything I can to make it work, and to not be wrong, at that time, because I didn't want to be another failure. And so-

Susan Hyatt:
Oh, that is something. Like, I am not way, I don't like to be wrong. I love to be right. Of course that's all ego, but still, it's like, "Oh, I'm not going to be wrong. I'm going to make this work," and how that can hurt you. Okay. Go ahead. Sorry.

Shannon Claire:
Yes, that's okay. And so, once I recognized that, I did bring it to his attention, and suffice it to say, things did not work out. They continued to get worse, and throughout the years, I mean, we had been at counseling pretty much from day one. And we were in counseling through a church that we were both attending at the time. This was the last year or so of the marriage, and I was being told to stay in this marriage, divorce is wrong, end of story, period, unless there's physical abuse, unless there's repeated adultery, like the neon signs of marriage problems.

Shannon Claire:
But emotional abuse, that's a little harder to recognize. And it got to the point where I didn't even want to live any more. There were multiple times I was driving in my car and I'm like, "I'm just going to take my seat belt off, I'm going to go as fast as I can in this highway and I'm going to crash into that wall and just be done with it."

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Shannon Claire:
It feels weird saying that now and looking back and remembering, at that time, I did have three kids and I was so full of despair. I didn't see another way out because I thought, "I can't leave because it's the wrong thing to do, but I can't stay." And it got to the point, I remember very clearly, when I used to say, like, "I can't do this any more. I can't do this any more." And then one day I was like, "I can do this. I could probably do this the rest of my fricking life, but I just don't want to." And that's when the suicidal thoughts were really strong and prevalent. And this entire time I had been building my business.

Susan Hyatt:
Right.

Shannon Claire:
So, I was building my business. I had homeschooled my kids for five years. I had left twice before-

Susan Hyatt:
Wow.

Shannon Claire:
... and moved back home. And it took until 2017 for me to finally get the wake-up call that I needed.

Susan Hyatt:
And so, let me ask you, because there are so many women probably listening who are living with emotional abuse that maybe don't recognize that this is abuse, like you were saying. Like, "I didn't even think this was abuse because even my church was saying, only if it's these things." So what are some of the signs of emotional abuse?

Shannon Claire:
Yeah. So, if you feel like you're walking on eggshells and you're constantly afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing because you're afraid of their reaction, that's a huge red flag that you may be living with an emotionally abusive partner. For me, he was a very, very angry person, and I will just say this. I still feel compassion for the man and I hope he finds his happiness, and I hope that he can recover from this himself. But that's one of the other things that kept me there for a long time, too, is, I felt bad, I felt sorry. But, anyway, sorry.

Susan Hyatt:
But when you felt like you were walking on eggshells and he was an angry person, what would happen if you landed on the eggshell wrong?

Shannon Claire:
Oh, gosh. Rage. Rage. He was constantly belittling me and just cutting me down. I heard the phrase, "Death by a thousand cuts," and that's what it felt like to me. I didn't even fully recognize it because I was so used to living in it. And one day we were in a therapist office, a new therapist, and we went together, and then I went alone the next time. And she said, "Are you okay? He was so aggressive toward you. He cut you down that entire time." And, honestly, it was like not even a bad session.

Shannon Claire:
So, that was another time I realized. So, there's the obvious things, name-calling, but those are obvious. You know that's wrong. It is the belittling, the squashing your dreams, the telling you how you should be living your life. I heard a lot about how my dreams were foolish. I was squandering the years away with my kids. What I wanted was a pipe dream. And just, instead of building me up and encouraging me, it was a constant pushing me down.

Susan Hyatt:
Yeah. I think that that's so good for Rich Coach Club listeners to hear, because even if your loved one doesn't know how your dream is possible, still supporting you figuring it out, because there have been so many times where Scott was like, "I don't even know..." Like when I became life coach, he's like, "I don't even know what that is, but okay." Or, he was like, "I don't even know people who would pay for that, but I'm sure you'll figure it out." Right? It was sort of like, what you're talking about is someone consistently telling you to stop going for what you want to go for, and making fun of what you want.

Shannon Claire:
Yeah. As an entrepreneur that was a big part of it. As a mother, it was constantly telling me what I was doing wrong with the kids. It was hours and hours of circular conversation that led to no solution. He just wanted to berate me and argue. And when I say hours, I mean quite literally hours of him just talking at me and not getting a word in edgeways.

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Shannon Claire:
Yeah. And it kind of slowly built up to that, but it didn't take that long. Within a year, I would say, it was to an extreme point, and it went up and down. So, that also was confusing. There is a cycle of abuse, and that's what made me realize, "This is abuse," because I read about it one day and I'm like, "Oh, my gosh. That is our story." Typically, it builds up, so there's usually a breaking point where there's a big explosion, somebody's physically abusive. That is when they will physically abuse their partner. And then, after that, there's the honeymoon period where they're remorseful. It seems like things could work out. It's going to be different this time, right?

Shannon Claire:
And, then, it slowly trickles back in and builds up, builds up, builds up. That tension continues to build until you get to your point where you're like, "I can't do this any more." They get to the point where there's a big explosion and that tension is released, and then it goes right back to the honeymoon period. So it keeps you trapped because there's enough hope in that honeymoon period that you think this time will be different.

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Shannon Claire:
It's never going to be different.

Susan Hyatt:
And what was it that finally led you to say, that, "Okay, this really is never going to be different and I'm going to end this for good."

Shannon Claire:
I started to feel unsafe physically. His anger and aggression became pretty severe and it got to a point where I had to call 911. My small kids were home. There was an incident in the house and I realized then that this is only going to escalate. And it took other people kind of showing me that, too, because I was still in this denial. And it was also all the things he told me. "Nobody else is ever going to want you. You're never going to make it on your own. The only reason your business is working at all is because of me. I think you're shit." Like, I could barely get him to watch my kids when I was out working assignments with my photography business.

Shannon Claire:
And so all of these things are in my head at once. Like, "How am I going to financially support my kids?" He's threatened so many times, if I leave he's not going to pay child support. He's going to quit his job. The kids aren't going to have health insurance. I knew he was going to make it as difficult as possible, but thinking about my daughter being in a relationship like that gave me the strength to say, "Enough." Because what example was I setting for her? And she was starting to show signs of a child who was witness to those things. She would get bellyaches when she heard him yelling. She would try to pull me away from him. She was about... How old was she at the time? Six, seven. She had told me once, "Mommy, I hear how daddy talks to you and I don't like it. If daddy doesn't love you, why did he marry you?"

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Shannon Claire:
And it was just heartbreaking to hear those things.

Susan Hyatt:
Yeah.

Shannon Claire:
And so that gave me the strength. That gave me the resolve that this is it. And even when I left that time, I was still willing to try to make it work. I was still willing to go to counseling, but I needed to get out. And I thought, "Maybe if we each have some time to heal on our own, then we can come back together. Things will be different." And I could very clearly, within a few months, see that was never going to happen. He was not going to change.

Susan Hyatt:
And so, what did you start to notice when you separated and then eventually divorced? What did you start to notice about your life, about your business? What started to happen for you?

Shannon Claire:
Oh, well, this is where it gets good.

Susan Hyatt:
Yes.

Shannon Claire:
My business exploded. Within a year, I had reached my income goals and was rising. 2018 and 2019 were the two best years of my entire life. I had never felt so free, even though I was dealing with an ugly divorce. Even though I still... Because of the kids, he was still in my life to a certain degree, but I no longer felt shackled to him and bound by him. I no longer felt like a prisoner in my own home. And so, I was living my best life. I was traveling a lot for clients for their photo shoots, going to gorgeous locations.

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). I noticed your-

Shannon Claire:
Yes.

Susan Hyatt:
... Bermuda pics the other day.

Shannon Claire:
Oh, Bermuda was amazing. One of my favorite photo shoots ever. Highly recommended, if anybody ever gets the chance to go. But, I just felt so good. I felt like a boss. I felt like who I always was inside. It's like the shell cracked and I emerged, and I came out and I was my true self. And I was able to impact others' lives, I was able to further pursue my coaching that I had been dabbling in since 2013. And the entire trajectory of my life changed. For the first time ever I had a savings account. I never had a savings account because he would spend the money. And so, for the first time ever, I just felt like a badass.

Susan Hyatt:
Wow. And it's so interesting how, whether it's an emotionally abusive relationship or an emotionally abusive full-time salaried position, or... Like the things that we allow to imprison us, and then we're scared, "Oh, well, if I make this change bad things are going to happen." Or who knows. And it's always... I mean, just without exception, when a woman owns her power and is like, "No more. I'm not taking this shit any more," whoever it's from. A boss, a loved one, a child, a parent, whatever, what happens when a woman steps into that power. And so, what is it that you love to do now that you're... Well, the more recent update is, you did meet someone and fell in love, and now you have a new baby. So you have three kids now, yeah?

Shannon Claire:
Four.

Susan Hyatt:
Four. Talk to us about these kids' ages.

Shannon Claire:
Yeah. So, my oldest has just turned 19, and then I have a 13-year-old, a 10-year-old, and a six-month-old.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay. And so you are a busy mother of four running your company from your home office. How did you meet your new husband?

Shannon Claire:
It was just by chance, actually. A funny story. Friends of ours wanted us to meet. They thought we'd really hit it off, and at the time he didn't want to meet me because I had kids. And he is five years younger, so he never had kids, wasn't married. I'm like, "All right, cool, I'm never going to meet this guy. It's all right." I was living my best life. And then we both happened to be out one night and we just started talking, and we ended up talking for hours, and he asked me to brunch the next day, and we've been together ever since.

Susan Hyatt:
Oh! So, what's exciting to you in terms of what you're working on now? And how you want to help women? Because, I mean, your personal story is obviously a big asset when working with women in the way that you do, whether it's photography or coaching.

Shannon Claire:
Absolutely. I think that my story just makes me relatable, and I can relate to women when they are struggling with whatever circumstances they're in their life because I've had so many, a diverse plethora of struggles throughout my life that I have overcome. And for that I'm thankful. I would never have chosen those things for my life, but I'm happy that I'm able to use my story and my past to help other people now. So, when it comes to my coaching, it definitely informs how I relate to the women I'm coaching. I can have, I think, more compassion and more understanding, and just know what it's like and give them more hope because I've come out on the other side 10 times better.

Shannon Claire:
And with photography, being in front of a camera is a very vulnerable experience for people. You quite literally feel exposed and every insecurity can come to the surface, especially for your first couple of shoots. And so, I, again, kind of use my story, my relatability, and say, like, "I get it. But I see so much more for you than you can ever see for yourself. Let's capture that on camera and blow your brand up, and just create iconic imagery that is going to grab people's attention but more importantly will help you see yourself in your truest form and your truest light."

Susan Hyatt:
I love that, and I think it's so important. I mean, Shannon has shot me. I had the pleasure of working with you when the 2016 election didn't go the way that we wanted. I had already planned a celebration dinner in D.C. which we thought would be welcoming the first female president, but it turned out to be more of a rally, like, let's come together and figure out what we're going to do now that Trump is president. And so, the women's march happened and I was looking for a photographer in the D.C. area and put out a call, and you were like, "Hey, I'll drive from Pennsylvania." And you were such a delight to work with.

Susan Hyatt:
And you did. I mean, those event photos, one of my favorite photos of me is standing out in front of the restaurant in the inn with all of those protest signs in the background, which, by the way, I don't think I've ever told you, Shannon. So all of the signs say, like, "Power to the pussy," and stuff like that, and I'm standing very proudly in front of these signs. And I think it was... I did a live Finish Strong Event in San Diego, so it would have been October of 2019. We did a big event and we enrolled people into my Mastermind, and it was a really successful event.

Susan Hyatt:
And then after that I sent out an email with that photo in it, even though it was like whatever, three years old, and was talking about empowerment or something. And there was this woman who had signed up for my Mastermind who backed out because she couldn't possibly have a mentor that would stand in front of signs like that. And my whole team, we were like, "Where has she been? Was she even at the event that you did?" It's not like that one event I talked like that, or celebrated feminism in that way, but iconic photos that capture who you are, they weed out people. Can you imagine someone like that in my Mastermind? That would have been a disaster, right?

Shannon Claire:
I mean [inaudible 00:34:00]. Yeah.

Susan Hyatt:
She would have been like, "Refund." But, it weeds out the people who aren't supposed to work with you. Iconic photography tells a story and attracts people who should be working with you. So you're excellent at that, and I actually think that you're a bit... Tell me what you think about this, but I find that people who have survived things and who have lived with abuse develop a super power of noticing... Because, you're on high alert so often, you pay attention to things that aren't noticeable to most people. Like you're on high alert paying attention to emotion, energy, the flicker of an eye.

Susan Hyatt:
You're always on guard in that way, but it grows your intuition, it grows your ability to read a room, it grows your ability to do all those things for survival, but now is a super power. I can totally see how that has helped you with your photography, and, of course, with your coaching, because so much of coaching is what's not spoken and what people aren't wiling to admit, and all that.

Shannon Claire:
Absolutely. I love that you just put it the way, because, honestly, it's so funny you say that. I just had a sales consultation last with a new client who is, yay, signing with me. But I said, "A lot of what I do is very intuitive." So, I already know what your shoot is going to be before we start planning. And it always ends up being that first initial vision in my head. I just get a feel for them as a person, as a human being and a unique soul, and I'm like, "This is how they need to be shown and this is how we need to capture them." And so, I love it that you just said that. Yeah, it's definitely super power, and it most certainly came from my history.

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). And, again, I like how you said, "I wouldn't have chosen those things." Of course, we're not like, "Yay, trauma." But, having become this badass woman who thrived despite that stuff, now these things are super powers that give you, like you said, you can empathize with people. You can relate to people where things aren't just, "All I do is win, win, win, no matter what." I love that song, but none of us win 100% of the time and use that to help other people. So, what are you most excited about right now that you're working on?

Shannon Claire:
I do have a little passion project. It's not little. It's actually pretty damn big, but we are shooting a documentary about my life story.

Susan Hyatt:
Oh, just that. Just a documentary.

Shannon Claire:
We've been working on it for a few years. The story has continued to unfold. I have anticipated it being done in the next year, maximum. But it's called Trapped by Faith, and it is about my story but more about a wake-up call to the church that emotional abuse is abuse, that women should not be counseled to stay in these types of relationships. And I will say, I don't think the counselors we saw had any ill-intent toward me or meant to do harm. But they were just not informed, and I felt like there was this multiple times it was said, like, "Oh, their hands are tied." I'm sorry, your hands should not be tied in this situation.

Susan Hyatt:
No.

Shannon Claire:
And so, my goal with this documentary is to open the eyes of people who are counseling within the church and who are... Just within the church, period, and say, "This is a real thing. Let's do something about it and do this differently so other women don't go through what she did." And, to give hope to women who are in these relationships and have them recognize, like, "Oh, this is abuse. This isn't just an angry husband. This isn't just an argument here and there which is typical or normal in any relationship. This is abuse. And, I don't have to be here for ever. I can leave. I can thrive. And life can be so much better on the other side."

Susan Hyatt:
Mm. I love it. So, where can people... Obviously, in the show notes, we're going to have all the deets about how you can hang out with Shannon, but where's your favorite place to connect with people?

Shannon Claire:
Instagram. So, I am theshannonclaire on Instagram, and my website is theshannonclaire.com. I've all sorts of fun stuff and freebies on there, and I will also have a place for the documentary on there. We are finishing up the trailer for it now.

Susan Hyatt:
Oh, I am obsessed. I am obsessed. We're going to have a watch party.

Shannon Claire:
Yes. Yes. I have pictures, so I'm actually kind of happy it did not complete before COVID, because I want to have a black-tie event that is invite or ticket purchase and have it be like a premiere of the documentary. And you will be on our guest list.

Susan Hyatt:
I will be there. We did that for the Bear documentary, and it was so much fun. It was just such a great way to showcase all that hard work. So, I can't wait to be there. I'm already imagining what I wear.

Susan Hyatt:
All right. So, if you love this podcast, please do me a favor flavor and go over to Apple podcast, or anywhere you listen to this podcast, and leave me a review. I want to share one my latest favorites. This is from someone who calls themself Sleepmatic. So, five star review entitled Fresh and Real. "I really appreciate the candid and real advice Susan offers, where a lot of people are overcomplicating things. It's great to see a fresh and real perspective." Thank you so much. I really feel seen here because I do strive to take what is often presented as overwhelming and complicated and break it down into some very simple action steps that people can take to build a business that they love.

Susan Hyatt:
So, my heart would absolutely and completely burst open if you took the time to leave me a review. So, listen, my dog, Mork, the beagle, is sending tons of doggy kisses your way. Thanks. Okay, one more thing before you go. Spring is a good time to dust off that vision board and evaluate how much progress you've made on your goals. Are there items sitting on your board, languishing in sadness? I'm going to post a picture in the show notes of my vision board. So, several episodes ago, and also on Go Time TV, I talked about how my vision board literally fell off the wall in my office and onto my head. Okay?

Susan Hyatt:
And so, I refreshed my vision board. And then what I haven't shared with you is that the redo, okay, I redid this vision board, because I'm like, "All right. The universe is literally hitting me up so bad that I need to redo this." I redid it, and then, a couple of weeks later I walked into my office, looked up at my vision board and the glue that I used was no longer serving as an adhesive. All of my vision board photos and things were falling off, like peeling off. It was comical. So I'm like, "All right, all right, all right." So, this morning I literally ripped it all off and threw it in the trash. So I have a blank vision board and I'm starting over.

Susan Hyatt:
So, ask yourself, if you've got stuff on your board that is just not cutting it, why haven't you made any movement on these things? And let's put together a simple action plan to renew your spirit and bring that vision to life. So, you can go check out my Go Time TV episode that's titled When You Lose Sight of Your Goals, and you can just search that on YouTube. We'll also link to it in the show notes. And I will keep you posted on mine.

Susan Hyatt:
Thank you for listening to this episode of the Rich Coach Club podcast. I hope this episode has inspired you to skyrocket your energy with a good spring-clean. You have my full permission to send yourself a bouquet of flowers to kick things off. You know what? I'm going to send my own self some flowers. You want to know why? Scott Hyatt, a.k.a. The Silver Fox who I brag about all the time, I'm throwing him under the bus. If you're my Facebook friends you already know this. He gave me a blow-dryer for Mother's Day. A fricking blow-dryer, y'all. Okay?

Susan Hyatt:
And not only that. It's a blow-dryer we already own. It's a Dyson, which is a great, nice, blow-dryer. Okay? We already own it, friends. So, obviously, he's in trouble, and he has not made up for the blow-dryer. I told him last night. Okay, it's Thursday when I'm recording this, I told him on a Wednesday night. Mother's Day was Sunday. I'm like, "You know, I've been waiting on you to recover from the blow-dryer, and you haven't done it." I thought he would send flowers. Like, what is going on? He's usually such a good gift giver. So I'm going to send myself a bouquet of flowers, and I hope you do, too. And if you do, post a picture of it and tag me in the comments.

Susan Hyatt:
All right, y'all. Thanks for listening, and I'll see you next week.

Enjoy The Show?

XOXO,
Susan

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