September 26, 2021
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One Follow Up Email Away From a Fortune

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Did you know that just one single follow up email can make a huge difference in your sales? Do you have a follow up email you need to send? In this episode of Rich Coach Club, I’m sharing a story about my Peloton bike and the power of a simple follow-up. If you’ve fallen off the “follow-up” bandwagon when it comes to prospective clients, I’ve got you boo-berry!

You’ll also hear from ​​Amy Stone, one of our newly-certified coaches in The University for Life Coach Training. As a Certified Life Coach, Certified Iron Man Triathlon Coach, Running Coach, and podcast host of Mile After Mile, Amy is a shining example of doing the work and following up. 

I’m particularly impressed with Amy because she made the ask to be a guest on this podcast… and she followed up! Amy put herself out there even at the risk of rejection. Fortunately, Amy got a “yes” — and I was blessed with an incredible guest.

What You’ll Learn from this Episode:

  • Why you should never stop being a student, even if you’ve been coaching for a while.
  • The power of expansion and the gift of seeing things through a different lens.  
  • Why you must learn from diverse voices and viewpoints if you want to become a successful and effective coach.
  • Creating a safe space for coaches in training to practice and thrive.
  • How to remove ‘barriers to entry’ and create what you crave.

Listen to the Full Episode:

Featured on the Show:

HOT ANNOUNCEMENTS

FINISH STRONG is one week away – October 1-3, 2021! If you’re a coach, consultant, or service-based entrepreneur and want to finish the year strong AF — get your booty there! You can join us in person in Evansville, Indiana, or buy a virtual seat. Grab your ticket here.

If you’re running a coaching practice or service-based business and want to earn $100k and beyond, check out our ON THE SIX mastermind.

Full Episode Transcript:

Susan Hyatt:
Welcome to The Rich Coach Club. The podcast that teaches you how to build your dream coaching practice and how to significantly increase your income. If you're a coach, and if you're determined to start making more money, this show is for you. I'm master certified life coach Susan Hyatt, and I am psyched for you to join me on this journey. Hey coaches, let me ask you, when was the last time you followed up. More specifically, when was the last time you followed up with a client who was on the fence about hiring you?

Susan Hyatt:
Often coaches come to me and feel frustrated about the sales follow-up process. They're not sure what to say and feel as if they've addressed all the prospective clients' objections. I've even had coaches say they prefer to hear a no than a maybe. The follow-up process is often shrouded in mystery. We don't always exactly know why this person won't say yes. And the fear of the unknown means that many coaches allow their perfectly warm leads to disappear into oblivion. Not on my watch blueberry. Today, I'm going to share a fun story about visiting my son, Ryan upgrading, my Peloton Bike and the power of a simple follow-up. Ready? It's go time.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay. Recently, Scott and I went to visit Ryan in Indianapolis. We had a delicious lunch. I snuggled my grand doggy Caesar and we did a little shopping. And as I wandered around a mall in Indianapolis, I spotted the Peloton showroom. Y'all know I love my Peloton and live for my daily rides with Cody or Robin. I dashed into the store and was immediately greeted by a friendly sales representative who steered me right over to the Bike+. So if you don't know, the Bike+ is like the original Peloton Bike, but with a few upgrades, like a monitor that's larger and that swivels and I'd already checked out the upgraded model online, but I just didn't feel like it had enough perks for me to buy it. I was perfectly fine with my current Peloton Bike.

Susan Hyatt:
And after trying to sell me on the new features, the sales rep tried a new approach. He asked for my rider name and pulled up my account and he'd noticed I'd completed over 700 rides and made a huge deal about it. I'm proud of my of rides, and honestly it feels great when someone recognizes your badassery. So then we launched into a very serious discussion about my favorite instructors. Right before I bid the sales rep goodbye, he asked if he could email me about the Bike+. Now, I'd already said I wasn't interested, but after our phone conversation and allegiance to all things, Cody Rigsby, I gave him an enthusiastic yes, to getting his emails.

Susan Hyatt:
As I'm stepping outside of the store, my phone instantly buzzed with an email from him. And I realized immediately that I was being put into a sales funnel and that I would likely get several emails about the benefits of upgrading my bike. And y'all let me tell you something. I did not mind, not one bit. This sales rep could have taken the easy route. I had turned him down so many times about the Bike+ in person, but he forged ahead and sent that follow-up.

Susan Hyatt:
Now, I couldn't get his follow-up email out of my mind. And by the time I arrived home, I was sold. I ordered my upgraded bike and even got a brilliant idea. My best friend Francis had been saving up for a Peloton. And if I upgraded my bike, I could gift my old bike to her, which made this whole experience even more magical. And to think it never would have happened, if the sales rep hadn't sent me the follow-up email. He could have said to himself, "Oh, she said no. I won't bother her with a follow-up." That kind of passive attitude would have cost him a sale.

Susan Hyatt:
Not a day goes by that I don't hear from a coach who is too afraid to reach out and send that follow-up email. They don't want to bother people. They feel discouraged after hearing the initial no. So today, I'm sending you my upgraded Peloton energy. I want you to draft that up email to someone who was on the fence about working with you and press send. I don't care what you've got to do. Conjure up that confidence and follow-up. Follow-up, follow-up. There are people out there just waiting to say, "Yes."

Susan Hyatt:
Hey, hey, hey, it's time for community wins. So this is always a really fun part of the show for me, because I love sharing everyone else's wins, victories, beautiful accomplishments. These are my clients or members of the Go Time Facebook group or members of my mastermind. And today, I want to give a special shout out to Suzy Rosenstein.

Susan Hyatt:
So Suzy is part of On The Six Mastermind and she recently had a major win. She got a mention with a link to her podcast in the New York Times, the New York Times. The modern love column of the New York Times. When I say this is epic, this is epic y'all. And what's fun is that Suzy got this mention by listening to a friend of hers talk about a topic that was writing on a topic. She had recorded a podcast episode about that topic that she thought they would enjoy. And she just sent her friend the podcast episode and said, "Hey, I recorded this episode a couple years ago. It's about step adoption. Thought you might find it useful."

Susan Hyatt:
So when this person wrote an article and pitched it to the New York Times, they included her as a reference. Her in this podcast episode. So it gets picked up by the New York Times and Suzy is obviously over the moon. And I love this example for a couple of reasons. We were talking about it in class last week. It's an example of taking the intellectual property that you've already created and sharing it with people, knowing that it's good, knowing that it can help people and sharing it, even if you've done it years ago.

Susan Hyatt:
Secondly, it's an example of how you may have the ambition to think big and think like, maybe one day I'll end up in the New York Times, but what's fun about life is that often how we end up in the New York Times is not how we imagined. And so if you're just continuously putting yourself out there and showing up for your work, showing up for your art, doors and windows open up all the time that are so unexpected and surprising. So I want to congratulate Suzy for taking the time to share her intellectual property with someone who was working on something big and then just allowing doors to open for her.

Susan Hyatt:
Congratulations, Suzy. I'm so proud of you. And hey, if you want to belong to a group of women who are unapologetically ambitious, who are entrepreneurs and proud of it, you might want to give On The Six or the Mastermind a shot. I'm going to put the link in the show notes.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay. I'm super proud to introduce today's guest. Today's guest is Amy Stone. She is one of our newest certified life coaches from The University of Life Coach Training. So, if you've not heard of The University of Life Coach Training, that is the university that I founded that has, in my opinion, the most...

Susan Hyatt:
Did. That has, in my opinion, the most diverse, educated, epic faculty on the planet. And what we do is we train coaches like none other. I'm so proud of the program and Amy has graduated from the program. So she's a certified life coach, she's a certified iron man triathlon coach, and a certified running coach. She has a big blended family with four kids, and she's a grandma too. She's completed seven full iron man triathlons and eight full marathons. She has a podcast that's award-winning called Mile After Mile. And she says she was born to be an entrepreneur, she set up her first business when she was in elementary school. So I can't wait for you to meet Amy and hear what's up with her because she's a great example of being a coach and doing the work and following up, let's learn from Amy.

Susan Hyatt:
Well, welcome Amy Stone. I'm so delighted to have you here on the podcast.

Amy Stone:
I'm so excited to be here. Thank you so much.

Susan Hyatt:
So I was just bragging about you earlier in the episode that you are a recent University for Life Coach Training graduate. And what I didn't say that I want to say now is that you made the ask and followed up with me about being on this podcast. So, what's interesting is that many people are like, oh, I wish I could be on the podcast, but they never make the ask. And you said something like in the Facebook group, like, "Hey, if you ever want somebody to come on and talk about being a student, hit me up." Or something like that. And I'm like, you know what? Yes. So you had the ambition and you actually verbalized it. And somebody said, yes, yay.

Amy Stone:
Yes, definitely something I've been working on, putting myself out there, making the ask, not being afraid to hear a no.

Susan Hyatt:
Well, I mean, and I think that's the thing, it's that, I mean, you're going to hear no's. It's just part of it as part of asking and I don't like hearing no. I hate hearing no. I want everyone to tell me. Yes. But sometimes rejection is blessings. So sometimes a no can be good and I'll look back and be like, thank God they didn't say yes. Oh my God, what a train wreck that would have been.

Susan Hyatt:
So let's talk about, you've been coaching for a while before even you became a student of the university you were already coaching.

Amy Stone:
I was coaching in the fitness world. A running and triathlon coach, yes.

Susan Hyatt:
Yeah. I was reading your bio and I was like, I don't think I realized you did that many iron mans. Holy shit.

Amy Stone:
Yeah. So I've got seven iron man finishes to my name.

Susan Hyatt:
Do you know, I'm considering doing a trail run. I'm considering it.

Amy Stone:
That's the first step. That's always the first step.

Susan Hyatt:
I've done one half marathon, and then I was training for another, I was actually training for a marathon, and when I did my 13 mile, whatever, run during training I got dehydrated and threw up at the nail salon I was so dehydrated. I didn't realize that's what it was. And my best friend Francis was like, "Listen, you dummy, you are dehydrated." And I don't know, it just did something to me and took me out. I was like, nevermind.

Amy Stone:
I've heard you talk about it. I don't think I hear you talk about it in a glowing, wonderful way that you had such a great time with that half marathon, so it's interesting that you're going back for more.

Susan Hyatt:
Well, the first half marathon I did, I did have a good time. It felt so good to me to accomplish that. I remember, just random people showing up along the route to cheer us runners on, I mean, that amazed me. They're sitting on the side of the road like, "You go girl, you got this."

Amy Stone:
It feels great.

Susan Hyatt:
It feels so great. It feels so great. And then I just was like, nevermind. But now I'm thinking I really love hiking and I love trails and I'm like maybe I'll do a trail run. So I'll keep you posted.

Amy Stone:
Keep me posted.

Susan Hyatt:
So let's talk about you. So why did you choose the University for Life Coach Training? because as we all know, there are tons of places where life coaches can get trained.

Amy Stone:
Yes, no, there are. Although I may have done my research in a slightly different way than other people, or maybe not. I signed up for the University for Life Coach Training because I was a follower of yours and a few other life coaches in the world. But I saw you, I knew how you coached, I've looked at the business that you were running and then you had created, and the way you were doing things. And I selected it because before you launched it, I was thinking, gosh I really love how she does this, I love how she coaches, I love how she helps people. I love all of these things. And then it was as if you were in my mind and you said, and now I'll teach you how to do it this way. And I was like, that seems like I should say yes.

Susan Hyatt:
Ah, thank you. Thank you. I do think I've been coaching now for 14 and a half years, and I have a couple of different certifications under my belt, and I'm grateful for the certifications that I had, and I love the coaching industry. And I've been training coaches for a long time. I used to train coaches for Dr. Martha Beck, and then I created my own bare coach certification program. so training coaches, wasn't new to me at all. But what interested me about starting the university was looking at some of the issues that needed to be repaired within the coaching industry and figuring out how to create a top notch coach training program that also trained coaches how to coach in a way that's not oppressive, how to be trauma informed, how to understand diversity, equity and inclusion. And do it in a way where coaches could also learn how to grow their businesses and how to treat coaching as a business. So, anyway. [crosstalk 00:16:13]

Amy Stone:
Those are good points because, obviously, you understand 5 million times more than that than I did when we started as student teacher. But it was fascinating to be on the other side of that, because I didn't know anything about the coaching industry, I didn't know anything about certifying coaches, I was learning as a coach, or even anything, I knew nothing. And so it was fascinating to me to be a part of that program and be exposed to so many things, which I did learn and have seen is so different from other things that are currently the way things are done.

Susan Hyatt:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So let me ask you this, what surprised you the most about the program?

Amy Stone:
What surprised me so much about the program was honestly how sort of exponentially it opened my eyes to things in my own life, which I was going into it sort of like, hey, these are these things that I'd like to learn and I just had a very open mind. It was really, really very interesting. And some of that, a big piece of that is the DEI component and all of the very, very intelligent and wonderful and gifted, delightful, spectacular faculty that we were exposed to. And I would show up for a lesson and I would be immediately informed and educated. And then the lesson would sort of expand in my mind afterwards. It's like an introduction and I would begin to think about things more deeply and see things in a different light, it was really amazing.

Susan Hyatt:
Yay. I love to hear that. And I do think, I mean, I took it very seriously that this faculty needed to be-

Susan Hyatt:
... faculty needed to be diverse, needed to be educated, needed to be super experienced. I really was trying to curate, and I think I did it. A faculty that was just like, I mean, just ironclad. There's no comparison to the level of this team. There is no comparison to this team. So yes, I teach some of the classes, but I love that it's like, you know what? This is like a faculty approach. This isn't just me showing up doing this, although I've done plenty of that in my day. I love having a team behind this.

Amy Stone:
No, it's great. It really was one of the more spectacular, special things. And it was unexpected because you were upfront with us that there was a faculty, but it was delightful every single time. They're really, really impressive. The faculty that teaches and also the mentor coaches.

Susan Hyatt:
Yeah. And the mentor coaching is something else that I really thought long and hard about. Like, what is the best way to train coaches to use these tools and also observe their coaching and help them in real time? What we've done is line up actual clients who are real people, who show up to these calls and you coach them in front of your coach mentors who are available to jump in and help or give you feedback. How did you find that experience?

Amy Stone:
I will be perfectly honest, the first time it was scheduled to happen, I spoke up and I was like, what is actually going on today? What do I need to do? But overall, it was amazing to get to test out the things I was learning in a safe space with a real person, both a client and a mentor. The mentor coaches are amazing because they are walking the walk, so to speak. They are actual coaches. You get to see them work. You get to learn from them. They share their experience. I mean, they actually mentor you. It was a truly, truly excellent experience. But the very first time my mentor coach would tell you that I showed up and was like, "Excuse me, pause. Time out." What is actually happening today?

Susan Hyatt:
Well, it is nerve wracking and I don't know that I've admitted this ever publicly, like on a podcast or much less my podcast, but one of the certifications I went through, it was my turn to coach. It was my week to coach, and I worked myself up so much that I got sick. Like, threw up in the bathroom and was like, I'm sick, I can't do it. And like totally bowed out. Was like, I can't do it today.

Susan Hyatt:
And I think back on that and giggle about it, because I was like, oh my gosh! I was so afraid to do it wrong. I was so afraid to just make a mistake or be vulnerable in that way. And so having that in mind, I wanted to make sure that our coaches in training felt safe, felt like it was a place where they could make mistakes and it was not the end of the world. And in fact it's encouraged that, if you were supposed to know all this, you wouldn't be in training. Anyway, I think back to my bathroom moment and like, oh my gosh!

Amy Stone:
I believe it. I believe it.

Susan Hyatt:
Another part of the training that I felt like you really were shining bright was there's a social justice project component to certification where we ask the students to select a project that is a social justice project. Submit the idea for consideration and we'll say yay or nay, and then do the dang thing. And so tell everybody about your project and what you learned.

Amy Stone:
First I'll say, because it's so funny you said, do the dang thing. The group of people who was going through this with me and was led by these mentor coaches and yourself, it is unbelievably inspiring. And so you laid out the project, just a very simple, here's what we're going to do. And I had an idea and then I thought, oh, I don't know how I'm going to do this. I don't know what I'm going to do, but this was pretty far along in the program. And so I was like coaching myself, and the other coaches were jumping in and we were all coaching each other. And it's like, no, how will we do this? And what will we do?

Amy Stone:
And so that was really interesting because you had an option of do something or not, but it was all self-directed. I was like, I could hear you in my head, like just do it. Just take the step and do it. Like, what would you do? As I said, my background was in running and triathlon coaching. And I went through and I had a few things on my mind that were considered, the words that the sporting industry uses is barriers to entry for these sports, like things that get in the way, reasons people don't do things. I wrote them down as a list. And I said, you know what? I will find people who are impacted by this in maybe a regular way or maybe a non-traditional way, and interview them for my podcast and share this story.

Amy Stone:
So they were hair care and swimming. Actually, hair care can be used as an excuse for like workouts generally. People will say, oh, women don't work out because of the burden of hair care. And that's a super complicated thing that is just wrapped up in there. And then swim caps is the second part of hair. And then size and sport in general. But specifically if you're going to put on a spandex outfit or a swimsuit, people are sensitive. Then gender, gender identity. Those were the three topics. So I went out there, I found people and I interviewed them and told their stories. Some were what you would expect. And some were very, very different. And I shared them with my audience.

Susan Hyatt:
I wrote down, while you were talking, barriers to entry. I do think it's interesting when you think about things that we may, as white women, not even understand our barriers for entry for black women, women of color. I was reading an article the other day, for example, about how just putting something online for free and thinking that means that it's equitable, is not taking into account people who do not have devices, do not have access to the internet. And it's just interesting to think through, if we have something available, how do we reduce the barriers to entry? With sport that's so fascinating.

Amy Stone:
It really is.

Susan Hyatt:
After doing that social justice project, what's your hope the impact of that project is going to have on your listenership, your community, yourself?

Amy Stone:
My wild dream would be that people would realize some of these things and work to acknowledge and remove the barriers to entry. I happened on the swim cap issue right before the Olympics, and then it blew up, which was a super interesting thing. The majority of the people who lead sporting organizations are white men with short hair or even bald. So you don't have an issue of putting a swim cap over a lot of hair, if that's your situation. You don't plan for that at all. And yet it's a massive issue for a lot of people who are in races where it's required or whatever.

Amy Stone:
So the people that I interviewed about the hair were interesting. I interviewed a hairdresser who taught me a lot about hair, because I do not have curly thick, wavy hair, so I was uneducated. And I was uneducated about the fact that that issue with hair care, some of it is styling your hair to be appropriately styled for the office. It's not actually an issue with the hair at all. The hair is fine. Hair is totally fine. And then I interviewed a male Sikh gentleman about his long hair, which doesn't fit in the swim caps. It's not just like women with long hair or anything, it's a whole group of people who-

Susan Hyatt:
... you know, long hair or anything. It's a whole group of people who... And it's such a simple thing to fix if you just know that it's an issue and you say, oh, you need a larger swim cap? Okay, great. Here they are. You don't know?

Amy Stone:
Well, I was going to say, what's the solution. It's as simple as that? Larger swim camps? It's a super simple solution. That's the reason it's so frustrating, is that all it is is just a decision to offer more sizes.

Susan Hyatt:
Hmm. Wow.

Amy Stone:
Right?

Susan Hyatt:
Amazing. Most of what I have noticed in terms of the changes that I've made in my life and my business, these are simple things that just enrich what I'm doing anyway. My hope is that through projects like that, that people's eyes and ears and minds and hearts are turned on and open to, hey, let's just work together and make sure that this is equitable.

Amy Stone:
Yes. It is kind of a switch. Once you turn the switch and realize that we all have our own position that we look at things, but it's just ours. If you use a circle as an example, there's 360 different angles. And then once you make the switch, then it's like, okay, well, this is just my situation. What happens to all the other people and their situations?

Susan Hyatt:
Well, and then we could go on and on. That could be another episode, but the individualism of Americans and pulling people, and this is personal development too, pulling it from me to we is a shift that I find that a lot of people in the US have difficulty with because our culture, it is so ingrained in us, the rugged individualist.

Amy Stone:
Yes, true.

Susan Hyatt:
And yeah. And that's not-

Amy Stone:
Well, see? And there, you just did it. The thing that I love about this is that the door is open, but I don't have the assumption that I'm all the way through. I just am trying to keep my eyes open.

Susan Hyatt:
Right? Same. Same. As the founder of this university, that does not mean that I am the expert in all of these things, and I actually have something that's going to come out about this. I am also not available for debate on any issue that has to do... There are people who come to my inbox and they'll have some news article about whatever's happening in the world, and they'll have a position and they'll assume they know my position on it. And they'll send it to me and say, well, what about this? Or what do you think about this? And I'm like, okay, who are you?

Susan Hyatt:
I'm not available 24/7 to debate any topic that exists under the sun just because I have a university and a podcast. And I'm just like, hey, I have a boundary here. I'm not interested in debating this for you. You seem really transphobic so kick rocks. I'm not available for this.

Amy Stone:
I totally think it would be wildly entertaining to spend an afternoon going through your inbox, because I don't get stuff like that in my inbox.

Susan Hyatt:
You know what? I honestly should do a Facebook or Instagram Live where I just sift through my mail live, so that people could really see. Because people are often like, "Really?" I'm like, friend, let me tell you about the stuff that people think because I'm a woman with an opinion that they can lodge to my inbox or DMs or whatever. But yes, I digress.

Susan Hyatt:
So Amy Stone, what do you think emerging from and being certified by the university, what do you think it has given you as a coach?

Amy Stone:
It gave me a lot more than I expected. My intention, my goal, I drove Patty nuts with this as I was signing up, my intention was to really learn about how to coach, the fundamentals of how to coach, and I did, I definitely got that. One of the things that I love about the way it is presented is it's not just one rubric or one matrix or one tool. It's a really strong foundation in practicing and understanding a variety of ways to coach. So that was the thing that I ran in, and I kept driving Patty crazy because I was like, I'm not sure how I'm going to use this in my life. I'm not sure how I'm going to use this. But I use it every day because it has really expanded the way I interact with people, the way I have learned to listen to people, the way I have learned to coach people and be able to be a coach as opposed to a fixer or a instructor.

Amy Stone:
So those are the big things. Oh, yes, thank you.

Susan Hyatt:
That was really well said. So now, you're currently in on the six, which is one of the masterminds and which is all about the business of coaching. And you commented that you're learning to ask. What's a recent big win of yours that you want to celebrate business-wise?

Amy Stone:
So this nice woman named Susan asked me to be on her podcast.

Susan Hyatt:
Yes, that is a win.

Amy Stone:
That is a win, and yes, so that is a big win, learning how to... [On The Six 00:32:50] is another group of truly inspirational business women, entrepreneurs who are in the trenches so speak of building a business, which is an amazingly powerful and supportive thing, to be surrounded by people who are actually doing it. And so working on my messaging, figuring out how to talk to people, being comfortable asking for business and embracing and embodying the idea of growing the business has been what I'm working on.

Susan Hyatt:
So what are you working on right now and how can people find you?

Amy Stone:
So this is fun for how people can find me. My website is Amysaysso.com. My name is Amy Stone. Amy is a really, really common name, as you may know. You probably know 20 or 30 people named Amy.

Susan Hyatt:
Yeah, I know lots of Amys, yeah.

Amy Stone:
So my website is Amy Says So, it's a spin on the old thing of because I said so. Like how friends say because I said so, so Amy Says So. So that's where you can find me. For a long time, I had been writing exclusively about running and triathlon, there's a ton of stuff on there about my triathlon adventures. I'm also a mom, I'm a step-mom, I'm actually a grandma if you can believe it.

Susan Hyatt:
I read that in your bio. I had no idea.

Amy Stone:
Yes, I know. That's the benefit of being a step-mom, you get to do these things early, so I'm a wonderful grandma. And so I am working on refining my messaging for life coaching and reaching out to the audience that I want to coach in the future, and so all of that is at Amysaysso.com.

Susan Hyatt:
Amysaysso.com, awesome. Well, I so appreciate you taking the time just to talk about the university, talk about what you're doing. You're a great example of being willing to ask and I'm so thrilled to have you as a certified life coach.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay. One more thing before you go, if you want something, ask for it. Even if the person says, "No, thank you," that's not necessarily a permanent answer. Things change. I'm a real life example of this. So what are you going to ask for today? Ask for it once, maybe even twice or three times. Your courage will be rewarded. So listen, if you want to be around people who are asking for the sale, who are learning how to do business in a way where they put pleasure first, you also might want to consider Finish Strong. Finish Strong is happening and it's coming up quick, October 1st through the third. There are in-person and virtual tickets available. Listen, this is my fourth year running Finish Strong, it's always a favorite. People always get tremendous results. Go to finishstrongevent.com and get your cheeks in the seat. Thanks for listening and I'll see you next week.

 

Enjoy The Show?

XOXO,
Susan

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Rich Coach Club Podcast Ft Amy Stone