May 9, 2021
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How to Get Rich by Taking Ownership of Your Work

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Today, I want to talk about Taylor Swift. 

Whether you’re a fan of hers or not, you cannot deny that this woman is showing up with some serious BOSS energy lately. 

If you don’t know what’s been popping for Taylor, let me school you real quick. 

As a budding singer and songwriter back in 2005, Taylor signed her first record deal. The contract stipulated that the company would own the original recordings of her first six albums. This is typical in many new recording deals, and in later negotiations, Taylor made sure to secure the ownership of her future recordings. 

Once her fame exploded, Taylor tried to buy back those early recordings – but the company refused, only to later sell them to another company owned by a man who repeatedly bullied Taylor throughout her career. Gross. 

Instead of shrinking away and backing down or chalking it up to a mistake and moving on, Taylor is taking OWNERSHIP by re-recording and re-releasing her old music. 

While you may not have an album recording saga to deal with, I’m willing to bet there’s an area in your coaching practice that you’re not OWNING right now. 

And taking ownership, Taylor Swift style is the best way to expand your coaching practice and turn it into an inspiring empire. 

Take ownership of your coaching practice today! Apply to join On the 6, my 12 month Mastermind program to grow your income without the hustle.

ACCESS INSTANTLY: Get essential tools to level up (or begin) your coaching practice! Download here.

What You’ll Learn from this Episode:

  • What Taylor Swift can teach us about taking ownership.
  • How The University for Life Coach Training is committed to creating Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

Featured on the Show:

Full Episode Transcript:

Susan Hyatt:
Welcome to the Rich Coach Club, the podcast that teaches you how to build your dream coaching practise and how to significantly increase your income. If you're a coach and you're determined to start making more money, this show is for you. I'm master certified life coach Susan Hyatt, and I'm psyched for you to join me on this journey.

Susan Hyatt:
Hey coaches, today, I want to talk about Taylor swift. All right, whether you're a fan of hers or not, you cannot deny that this woman is showing up with some serious boss energy lately. And if you don't know what's been popping for Taylor let me school you real quick. As a budding singer and songwriter back in 2005, Taylor signed her first record deal and the contract stipulated that the company would own the original recordings for her first six albums. And this is typical in many new recording deals. And in later negotiations, Taylor made sure to secure the ownership of her future recordings. Once her fame exploded, Taylor tried to buy back those early recordings, but the company refused, only to later sell them to another company owned by a man who repeatedly bullied Taylor throughout her career, gross.

Susan Hyatt:
So instead of shrinking away and backing down or chalking it up to a mistake and moving on, Taylor is taking ownership by re-recording and re-releasing her old music. While you may not have an album recording saga to deal with, I'm willing to bet there's an area in your coaching practice that you're not owning right now. Ouch. And taking ownership, Taylor Swift style is the best way to expand your coaching practice and turn it into an inspiring scalable company.

Susan Hyatt:
Let's examine some places in your coaching practice, where you can take ownership. First, look at the patterns in your professional life that aren't serving you. Things like a revolving door of employees and contractors. It seems no one gets your mission and their performance is lackluster, or a roster of nightmare clients who beg for discounts and expect you to bend over backward, or referral partners and other collaborations that never seem to work out and leave you with a mess of stress. When these patterns come up in my business, I take ownership of this situation by asking myself what role did I play in creating this unpleasant situation? Did I ignore my intuition during the hiring process? Did I put my needs aside to please a client? Did I have leaky boundaries with my policies? Did I overlook a red flag before entering a collaboration?

Susan Hyatt:
I get brutally honest with myself to understand how the situation happened, and like Taylor swift, I look at how I can course correct for the future. So instead of rerecording songs, I might hole up in my mental studio and create a firm set of boundaries so things don't devolve into a hot mess once again. And after you take a look at your patterns, I suggest taking ownership of your work. Often coaches get certified, schooled, or mentored using a specific system. I know I was, but to really make an impact, you have to eventually evolve from that system and begin to create your own tools, frameworks, and intellectual property. So this is something that I teach all my clients and the coaches who are enrolled at the University For Life Coach Training.

Susan Hyatt:
A lot of coaches never create their own signature system because it feels too big and daunting. And just like most artists wouldn't rerecord their own songs for the same reason, but taking ownership means putting in the work to create a unique system of your own that will attract more clients, enable you to help them get better results, and hone your unique perspective. Finally, taking ownership of your voice and use it standing up for what you believe in, advocating for others, and being fearlessly bold is critical if you want to build a successful coaching practice. Clients hire coaches who stand out, speak out, and as I like to say, make a scene. As a coach you're a role model. When you show up unapologetically, your clients feel emboldened to show up too. I know it's not easy to take ownership of your voice and use it. I'm sure it wasn't easy for Taylor Swift to use her voice to stand up to powerful recording company moguls, nor was it easy when she won a civil case against a DJ who groped her at an appearance, even when his defense lawyers tried to undermine her credibility on the stand.

Susan Hyatt:
In the past, I've been the woman who got attacked and didn't speak up. I've been the one who stood up, but back down when the opposition felt too strong. I've also been the one who hid, hoping someone else would speak out instead. But I made a commitment, no more of that shit. Now my motto is always to make a scene. The best way to take ownership and show up for yourself and your clients is to speak out and take brave action to correct injustice. Now that you know what ownership looks like in a business context, I want you to play detective and investigate. So where are there places where you need to take ownership? And can you find those? And if so, I give you full permission to make a scene.

Susan Hyatt:
I want to add another thought that I had, actually after I recorded this whole episode. Sometimes you need to locate where you're settling and take ownership of that and course correct that. And so an example for me would be hiring a full-time executive assistant. I almost, I've been in the hiring process recently and I really need a stellar full-time executive assistant who understands this industry and who understands our online systems, including Ontraport. And I almost settled and hired somebody who was good enough. And thank goodness, my project manager, Carrie, on my team was, "This is not going to work. These candidates are not going to work and here's why." And I was, "Oh my gosh, I almost did it again." I almost recreated another situation where I was hurriedly rushing and hiring someone because I need help instead of holding out for what I know I need.

Susan Hyatt:
And how often do we do that as women? I've blogged and written a lot about no more crumbs, you deserve what you need. I deserve the right kind of assistance so that I can show up and better serve all y'all. And so I just wanted to add that when you're investigating what you need to take ownership of, I'm betting, you'll find places where you've been and saddling. All right, I love, I love bragging on y'all. And it's time for some community wins. So I have a program called Quickstart that you can hop in on. We're going to put details in the show notes. It's an eight week mastermind.

Susan Hyatt:
And we were asking the current quick starters what they thought of the program and Helen Louise Farmer, she is such a bright light in the world and she rates, "Quickstart has given me the building blocks I needed for both vision and structure for myself and my business. So many of the business programs and incubators I've done or applied to including unsuccessfully, haven't been a good fit for me and being part of a community and experiencing expertise where you're told you can and supported through the experience and practical doable solutions, like lead magnets, and landing page templates, and live chats, and peers has been so liberating." I just want to give a shout out to Helen because my goodness, she has had so much forward motion. She's completed so much work in this program and just couldn't be prouder that you're doing the thing.

Susan Hyatt:
And so if you're somebody who has been looking for a community that would help you with your mindset and practical strategy, this is the one for you. So congratulations Booberry, proud of you. And I can't wait to see what you create moving forward.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay. We've been talking about taking ownership in this podcast episode, and I am so excited to chat with one of the University For Life Coach Trainings faculty members, Rae McDaniel. You're about to have the best time listening to Rae. So Rae is a gender and certified sex therapist and coach, and is the founder of the online community, The GenderFck Club, as well as Practical Audacity, a gender and sex therapy practice in Chicago. They've been featured in the New York Times, Refinery29, and Women's Health. Rae's work is driven by one revolutionary idea, transitioning your gender can be a process of curiosity, personal growth, and pleasure instead of a time that's fraught with private suffering, the fear of rejection by their families, and anxiety about not being trans enough to be valid and accepted by the trans queer community.

Susan Hyatt:
With their research backed GenderFck model, Rae now runs a one of a kind online coaching community for transgender and non-binary folks to make desperately needed support accessible for people in underserved areas. So y'all are about to get your lives right by listening to these gems that Rae is going to drop in this interview episode. Take some ownership for your knowledge and dive in to this interview. Welcome to the podcast, Ray McDaniel.

Rae McDaniel:
I'm so excited to be here. Thanks for having me.

Susan Hyatt:
I'm so excited to be here too, here as we both sit without executive assistants, we were both...

Rae McDaniel:
Oh, my gosh.

Susan Hyatt:
We were both commiserating for all y'all listening. I posted about having a rotten day yesterday. Actually I said, I just got some bad news, and unfortunately people's minds go to the worst. And they're like, "Are you dying? Is everyone healthy? Has..." And I'm like, okay, I'm being a little old, right. Is mark alive? But it's really that we both need executive assistance. So maybe we'll put a link in the show notes, Rae, about people get apply to work with you.

Rae McDaniel:
Please. Yeah, let's do it. That would be lovely.

Susan Hyatt:
Let's do that. So Rae and I were chatting about, first of all, I love having you on the faculty for the University For Life Coach Training. If y'all haven't caught any of Rae's classes, either inside Rich Coach Club or I interviewed Rae for the university that's on YouTube, we can link to all that in the show notes, I have brought Rae in to train my coaches and also continuing education for better certified coaches because Rae has such an exceptional teaching style. And I wanted to ask you, Rae, what do you think makes you an effective teacher? Because everybody at the Ultimate Coaching Convention loved your teaching style. I love your teaching style, obviously. What do you think contributes to that?

Rae McDaniel:
Oh that's such a good question. I think I have a little bit of a leg up because I have a therapy background. So I'm trained as a therapist. I have lots and lots of supervision. So I think how that applies to coaching is getting that training, getting that mentorship, having somebody actually listen to your sessions and help you get better. And also being surrounded by people that are doing the work that I want to be doing that are a level or two above me. And being in peer relationships with them, I think makes me a better teacher, makes me a better therapist and a coach. I think another thing is just doing it, right? I've been doing it a long time and you build skills that way.

Rae McDaniel:
And I think at the end of the day, my style can be summed up as I'm a compassionate challenger because I tend to be very empathetic to people. I am kind to the people that I'm talking to, especially when we're talking about scary subjects, right? Quote, unquote, scary subjects, where people are afraid to mess up. They're afraid to say the wrong thing. They want to be affirming and they don't want to screw up, and giving them a space where it is okay, and not going to be punished to ask a question that they don't quite know how to phrase. And then them being open to me gently shifting the language or challenging a component of that, I think leads to a style that is laid back, but also challenging.

Susan Hyatt:
You just nailed that. Absolutely. That is the most perfect description of how you are, because you're just like, hey... Even I had Rae do training, a DEI training if you will, inside my higher level mastermind, Rae's is like, "Let's pick on Susan. Let's look at Susan's website." But the way that you did it was, "Hey, I bet you could accomplish everything you want to accomplish on that homepage without using the word women 500 times."

Rae McDaniel:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Susan Hyatt:
And I didn't at all feel now, of course I have done a lot of work to not feel necessarily defensive or threatened and being open to feedback, but your delivery of it was, "Oh, yeah, I need to get my team on that." So well done.

Rae McDaniel:
Thank you.

Susan Hyatt:
So let's talk about some of the topics that people get all freaky doubt about and are, "Oh, do we have to talk about this? I don't know. I don't know about this." So you are super passionate about inclusion in the coaching industry for trans folks. And you also said something to me that I was, "Oh, this is a door we are walking through, that gender transition is self-growth." So let's talk about it.

Rae McDaniel:
Yeah. I think my fundamental mission of what I'm trying to do with both my work with clients and my work in the DEI space, is to change the narrative of gender transition as a whole. So there's this narrative that it is this anxiety producing, super confusing, awful time in someone's life that they just have to slog through mud to get through. And I don't think it has to be that way. I view gender transition as a process of self-growth or self-actualization, that can and should be celebrated and can, and should be fun. And not saying that there aren't things in our society that make being trans, being non-binary, and gender transition hard. Obviously there are, there are tons of barriers happening and I think that there is a lot that we can do to change the narrative to this narrative of self-growth that makes the process much better and much easier, and we actually have some joy and pleasure in it along the way.

Susan Hyatt:
Wow. One of my very first clients, a woman named Kate, transitioned during our coaching relationship. And Kate, I know won't be upset with me bragging about her. Kate, I just fricking love this story so much or this... I refer Kate to every single person who wants to transition, who is struggling. Here's somebody who transitioned and has a wonderful life and lives in or lived in up until recently, one of the smallest, most hick towns in Indiana, 30 minutes from where I live. I mean, when you think of wherever, listeners, wherever y'all live, think of that town y'all make fun of. But it's like, oh, I don't want to go out to Effingham or wherever it is, that's in the Savannah area where I grew up. Effingham is actually nice now, but nice people there, but it's that town where you're like, "Oh my gosh, I don't want to live out there." Okay. And makes civil war handgun and rifle replica's.

Rae McDaniel:
Wow.

Susan Hyatt:
So is in the civil war reenactment business and makes firearm replica. I mean, can you think of a more white male red, I'm going to say it, redneck kind of environment to transition with?

Rae McDaniel:
Wow, that is...

Susan Hyatt:
Right.

Rae McDaniel:
That's wow.

Susan Hyatt:
This is sort of, listen, Kate is living her best life and also sells civil war firearms to rednecks and is completely open and authentic about it. Okay. So it can be celebrated and it can be fun. We're not diminishing the challenges that go through that. What do you think in all of the people that you work with and help them bring more joy and fun and pleasure into transitioning, what do you think are the key components to making that more of a reality than it being horrible, awful, scary, maybe I shouldn't do it?

Rae McDaniel:
Well, I think a lot of it is taking something that feels like this giant huge thing, right? Gender transition as this cloud that overshadows your entire life and really breaking it down to the tiny steps that are right in front of you, and that looking at those tiny steps from a place of curiosity and experimentation. And I call that play, right? And for example, so one thing I might do with a client that is afraid of starting hormones, because they don't know what the end result is going to be, the process is scary to them, they don't know how their body might change or might not change, or how they might feel, they will stop themselves from taking that first step because of all of those doubts and fears.

Rae McDaniel:
So I would work with this person to say, "Okay, so let's set up an appointment with a doctor just to ask questions. Let's go ask all those questions that you don't know that you're worried about," and that step one. And then we're going to see how do you feel after step one? Do you want to take step 1.5 or do you want to go back to the drawing board and say, maybe this isn't for me? And if you want to move forward, step 1.5 might be getting the prescription and not filling it and just looking at it for a while and seeing how you feel. Or picking up the prescription and sitting it on your dresser and just kind of sitting with it for a while to see how you feel. Or taking one dose and seeing how it feels to have hormones that are affirming to you running through your body and also saying, okay, a lot of these changes that are irreversible they become a little bit later.

Rae McDaniel:
Some of them happen a little sooner than others, but it doesn't happen overnight. You're going to have some amount of control over your process. And if you ever get to a place where you are uncomfortable with how your body is changing, or you don't like how you feel, you can stop. Hormones are not an escalator. You don't have to take them forever. You can work with your doctor to find a dose that works for you, or you can choose to go off them completely if that doesn't feel like it fits for you. It is really a choose your own adventure and not take sound so much of the pressure that my clients experienced in making this choice with a capital fee into these tiny little choices that isn't... It likely talk about consent, right? It's an ongoing and enthusiastic yes or you can stop at any point.

Susan Hyatt:
And you know, you can tell your therapist too, because I'm laughing because I'm thinking back to a therapy session I had where my therapist is like, "Maybe you could just put your cell phone in a kitchen drawer and see how that feels." It's this very calming, it doesn't have to be black and white, I'm not answering calls after three forever. So when you put it that way, it's really your process for working with folks in terms of being curious and having a sense of experimentation, you call play, and taking these tiny consent based turtle steps is really great, great coaching as well on any topic. And so the work that you're doing as it relates to helping those of us in the coaching industry, right, we're on the same mission where we're really out to change the face of the coaching industry and create a much more inclusive and equitable environment. What are you run up against or what do you think are some of the biggest obstacles or issues that you see in the coaching industry that you're like, wow, okay, we've got some work to do?

Rae McDaniel:
The biggest one that I can think of is that we have a lot of coaches who want to be affirming, but are so terrified of making a mistake that they actually distanced themselves from this population because they assume that the population is way too complicated for them, that they could never coach them. And I think that's a myth, even if you are a cis-gender identified person, meaning that the sex that you were assigned at birth still feels it fits for you, even if that is your identity, I think there is a lot of work that you can do with a trans and non-binary client where you don't have to have that lived experience to be able to do good work. So I think that's number one, is knowing that you can do it.

Rae McDaniel:
You mentioned the face of the coaching industry, and I think quite literally a lot of the reason that trans and non-binary folks are not engaging with coaching is that they don't see themselves in it. They don't see themselves and the marketing pictures, they don't see themselves in the marketing copy. There are a lot of coaches out there that are marketing to women or to men. Very few coaches, I think maybe two or three that I even know of that are marketing themselves to the trans population. But even for folks who are marketing themselves, for example to women, I find a lot of the time that maybe their audience is not exclusively cis-gender women. And then if they get a little bit more intentional and purposeful about who are they trying to call in, who is their ideal client, that they can probably do that in a more gender inclusive way than they're doing it currently?

Susan Hyatt:
I agree. Especially, I mean, most of the questions that I get especially now that the university is such a priority of my mission, and so clients who are in other groups, I'm trying to bring some of the DEI focus into my other groups, my business groups. And in those groups, what I notice is exactly what you're saying, number one, they're scared, they want to ask questions, they're scared they're going to ask it wrong. And in fact, the few times I've brought DEI people in, I mean, that's been the number one thing, am I going to be able to screw this up not have cancel culture come after? Is it okay if I say it wrong?

Susan Hyatt:
So I'm hopefully [inaudible 00:27:25] who's on our faculty calls it brave space, creating brave spaces where people can mess up. And I think you create that beautiful vibe as well. So they're scared of that. And then I am taking very much to heart what you've communicated in terms of the trans community not seeing themselves represented anywhere, whether it's in photos or copy, or just sort of how can we do better with that? And one of the ways that you challenged me is to look at my own home page or look at my website and see where I can use folks instead of women, or just get the message across that shows inclusivity. The branding of my company, there's no mistaking who I'm working with and what it's about really.

Rae McDaniel:
Exactly.

Susan Hyatt:
But it's more being explicit and being obvious that I am affirming and welcoming.

Rae McDaniel:
Yeah. And I think a lot of people, when we start having the conversation about inclusive language, they feel they've lost something. We were talking about that right before we got on. And I would like to reframe that as you're not losing something or making something more generic by getting rid of the word women or unnecessary gendering, you're actually being more specific. So you are having to really think about what is the language that I am using that is going to get me the clients that I want in a very specific and a very intentional way that is not as inclusive to the most amount of people who were in that ideal client range that I can be? And that is, it's not making your brand generic, it is really getting very purposeful with it.

Susan Hyatt:
I love that word purposeful. That is something I feel very passionate about, is educating people in my world that, listen because people who have a lot of privilege, and let's face it, I have all of it. I have all the privilege, except I'm not a man, tend to be resistant to change like this and will say things like, oh, I just can't say... Now we can't say that, or now they're coming after Mr. Potato Head, or all that kind of stuff. And it's, "Yoh, okay." The world is richer and better, and business is better, everything is better when we're more inclusive. What do you say to that when you hear entrepreneurs just to get frustrated and like, oh, now we can't even say that.

Rae McDaniel:
Well, first of all, who the fuck cares about Mr. Potato Head.

Susan Hyatt:
I know.

Rae McDaniel:
Does anybody really.... I'm so upset that we've dropped the Mr. And it's just Potato Head.

Susan Hyatt:
I know, I was like, "Oh, are you really that attached?"

Rae McDaniel:
But I think that speaks to the larger conversation about this, is we're so attached to this gendered language about things that are not gendered. It's a potato, it's [inaudible 00:31:13]. I think that carries over to the coaching conversation as well, is what are we really losing by shifting our language slightly? Because let's be honest, this is not a huge, huge shift to say, hey folks or hey team instead of hey ladies, or hey ladies and gentlemen. It is a simple switch that invite more people in. And I just don't see that as a negative thing in any way.

Susan Hyatt:
I don't either. And I'm very grateful to be from the south because I can use y'all. I mean, I always have. But it's I'm colored. I'm also, you've probably heard me call people blueberries. And my team we've been experimenting with all kinds of salutations, but it's fun. It's, okay. So we're not saying that, we've got better things to say.

Rae McDaniel:
And we can come up with fun things like blueberry, which I absolutely love. Thank you.

Susan Hyatt:
I was just down in the basement because I bought these rolly shelving things to hold all the swag from all the different programs so I can pack these boxes. Again, I don't have an executive assistant. But anyway I was kind of going through some of the old swag and I was like, "Oh my God printed these hay blueberries postcards that I never used." So maybe I'll send you a blueberry postcard, right?

Rae McDaniel:
Thank you. I love that. And I think the other thing that I would say to that is discomfort is not harm, being slightly uncomfortable as you are growing in your understanding of gender and gender diversity and language that is inclusive, it's not hurting you in any way it's simply you growing. But what is harm, what is hurting people is feeling they don't belong in a space. It's feeling excluded. It's feeling that they have to shut down a huge important part of themselves because it isn't explicitly welcomed in a space. What is harm? What we're doing, how we are growing it's simply growth it's not hurting any of us.

Susan Hyatt:
That is a word because, exactly you can feel uncomfortable, you can be wildly uncomfortable, and it's a good thing.

Rae McDaniel:
Yup.

Susan Hyatt:
It's like, stop, stop with all your feelings about just feel your feelings and let's go, let's grow. Okay. So what are you excited about in your business right now?

Rae McDaniel:
Well, first of all, I'm excited to get a new executive assistant.

Susan Hyatt:
Hopefully this podcast will recruit somebody wonderful.

Rae McDaniel:
Yeah, for all of y'all out there please. Other things I'm excited about, so I'm hopefully going to be writing a book soon in the next few years, that would be very exciting working on a proposal for that. I'm excited at my therapy practice in Chicago is going to be getting a new space this year because we have outgrown ourselves in 2021.

Susan Hyatt:
Wow.

Rae McDaniel:
It's just been fun. So going to be doing that. I'm also really excited to be in a place in my business where I can hire help. And I have a team that can help me put out more content for folks that is free, or low cost, or able to really engage with the people on my newsletter list and my Facebook group in ways that are adding value to them. Now, I've been so busy building the business that I haven't had as much time for that as I would like, and so I'm hoping 2021 is going to bring lots of time to be able to do that.

Susan Hyatt:
That is amazing. So what do you think has caused so much growth in your company this past year?

Rae McDaniel:
Well, the pandemic means that people are needing mental health support. So a lot of that growth has come from my therapy practice and just a huge increased demand for therapy services. And replicating myself, I think that's one thing that we talk about in the coaching industry, is once you figure out what your niche is and what you do your way to scale is teaching other people to do that.

Susan Hyatt:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Rae McDaniel:
You're doing with the University For Life Coach Training. So being able to do that with my staff, not being afraid to hire or take risk there has been one thing that I thank God for all the business coaching that I have gotten that has made me want to throw up a little bit in my mouth and pushed me to make those big hiring decisions that I needed to before I felt ready. Because that has been such a lifesaver as we've doubled or tripled the size of this business every year that we've been around.

Susan Hyatt:
Yes, I agree. And I'm kind of in that space right now again. It keeps happening where it's, "Oh my God, somebody else is on payroll?" But it's looking at it more as an investment in growth and I mean, it just makes sense the more, if it's the right hire, the more people you have helping you grow the value and how it's serving people and all those things that the more money you're going to make. That's just how it is.

Rae McDaniel:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). And the more space that I have as CEO of this company, as someone who is creating content to think, to read a book, to grow, to invest in myself so that we can continue to grow.

Susan Hyatt:
Yes. I think that point that you just made is part of the foundation of everything that I do on the business side, because the bear methodology is pleasure based. And so in business, it's all the bare principles, but just applied towards business. And it's very much part of my mission that it's, if you don't have downtime, if you're not resting, if you aren't taking exceptional care of yourself, as I love Denise Duffield Thomas, how she says, "If you kill the golden goose, there are no more golden eggs," right? You are the goose, the golden goose so you better take some good care. And honestly, I see in our industry and other thing I want to change is the opposite of it, people get into becoming coaches because they want to change the world, and they want to serve people, and they want to help people with their problems, and then they end up burning themselves out in the process.

Rae McDaniel:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). I think if we've learned one thing over 2020 and 2021 as a therapy practice and as myself as a coach, it's that burnout is a real thing. We're all exhausted. The Zoom fatigue is real and we have to take care of ourselves first. My admin team was just talking about how we make our therapists take time off every quarter. We give them time off that doesn't transfer. So they either take it or it's gone. That's to make them take it. But we haven't been taking time off ourselves. We've committed to actually taking time off as an admin team as well to recharge.

Susan Hyatt:
I agree with you. And and I think there was a social worker actually named Markita Thompson, who is also a certified coach that right after I trained as a coach, I jumped right into master coach training as well and she was in that group with me. And I remember we were working on a group project. So this was 2008 and we put together a CD of these motivational talks, it was a compilation. I have to find it. I'll have to post the cover, it's hilarious. Anyway, throughout that project, Markita had great boundaries, first of all, but secondly was, "Well, we have to get this done by a certain time because I take the entire month of August off." And I was, "What do you mean you take the whole month?" I'm like, "What come again?" And she's like, "Yeah."

Susan Hyatt:
She lives in Port Washington and that's the prime time for the weather. And she was, "So every year I take the entire month of August off." And I'm like, " Bitch," I went to my calendar and I was, "Okay, we're going to get some Markita action happening." And so I decided that the holidays, at that time my kids were little. So I decided the holidays was when I wanted to do that. And so it's more like three and a half weeks. But I am very intentional about that, however, I noticed the past year during the pandemic, I had extra vacation scheduled and didn't take them because of everything happening, and like you said, this surge of need. And so now I just booked a trip to Puerto Rico because I am double vaccinated and I'm going for my birthday. I am back. I am back to that Rae. And I think anybody listening, we all have to take that downtime because there's always more work, there's always a client emergency, there's always more and more and more we could be doing and we have to decide that our health is our number one priority.

Rae McDaniel:
Absolutely. And I absolutely love that.

Susan Hyatt:
So Rae, it has been a delight. Per usual, where can people, of course we'll put links to everything in the show notes, but where do you prefer to hang out with people?

Rae McDaniel:
So people can find me on social media @practicalaudacity on Instagram, on Facebook, you can check out my website, genderfck.club, that's genderfck.club with no u, because we are polite, .club, or you can find me practicalaudacity.com.

Susan Hyatt:
All right. Thank you, Rae.

Rae McDaniel:
Thank you so much for having me.

Susan Hyatt:
Okay. One more thing before you go, ownership isn't limited to your professional life. I hope after listening to Rae, you realize you can take ownership in your relationships, your finances, or help. If you're sick of handling that invisible workload in your life, take ownership and get your family to help. If you're worried about retirement, take ownership of your money beliefs. My friend, Rachel Rogers has a wonderful book that just dropped called, We Should All Be Millionaires, that's a must read. If you signed up at a new gym and the trainer can't stop soliciting you because your intake form doesn't show an ideal body mass index, here's what to do, tell that bull to study up on the racist roots of BMI and how it was created in the 19th century by a white German man, simply because he was passionate about what the average man looked like. And somehow this is supposed to be our standard of health, talk about making a scene. That's a topic for a whole another episode.

Enjoy The Show?

XOXO,
Susan

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